Why red wine could be good is red wine good for gut health for your gut
Why red wine could be good is red wine good for gut health for your gut
Polyphenols are also found in many fruits and vegetables. Our guts contain trillions of bacteria and other micro-organisms and this community of "friendly" bugs helps keep us healthy. Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram back after outage 1 How your trip to a game reserve can stress animals "However, more research is needed before making any firm conclusions about any associations between red wine intake and changes in the gut flora, and whether this is likely to result in tangible health benefits. The researchers say heavy consumption is not recommended and would probably have a bad effect on gut bugs, as well as on a person's general health. Have you been getting these songs wrong? Polyphenols, such as resveratrol in the skin of red grapes, are micronutrients that are thought to have beneficial properties and act as a fuel for useful microbes living inside our bowel. The participants - all twins enrolled in health research programmes - were asked about their diet and how much and what type of alcohol they typically drank. On your mobile On smart speakers Get news alerts Contact BBC News Home News Sport Reel Worklife Travel Future Culture Music TV Weather Sounds Terms of Use About the BBC Privacy Policy Cookies Accessibility Help Parental Guidance Contact the BBC Get Personalised Newsletters Why you can trust the BBC Advertise with us AdChoices / Do Not Sell My Info © 2021 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read about our approach to external linking. BBC Homepage Skip to content Accessibility Help Your account Home News Sport Reel Worklife Travel Future Culture Menu More Search Home News Sport Reel Worklife Travel Future Culture Music TV Weather Sounds Close menu BBC News Menu Home Coronavirus Climate Video World Asia UK Business Tech Science Stories More Entertainment & Arts Health World News TV In Pictures Reality Check Newsbeat Long Reads Health Coronavirus Why red wine could be good for your gut - in moderation Published 28 August 2019 comments Comments Share close Share page Copy link About sharing Image source, Getty Images Red wine could be good for the gut, increasing the number of different types of helpful bacteria that can live there, according to researchers. Gut bug diversity increased the more red wine a person consumed, although occasional drinking - one glass a week or fortnight - appeared to be sufficient. Dr Megan Rossi, a consultant dietician at King's - not involved in the research - and a spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association, said: "There are merits in the findings. I wouldn't recommend that people start drinking red wine, but if people do drink a little bit now and again then they shouldn't feel guilty - and it might even be beneficial." Facebook says the outage was caused by a faulty configuration change. "If you must choose one alcoholic drink today, red wine is the one to pick as it seems to potentially exert a beneficial effect on you and your gut microbes, which in turn may also help weight and risk of heart disease. "We are starting to know more and more about gut bacteria. is red wine good for gut health It is complex, and we need more research, but we know that the more diversity there is, the better it appears to be for our health." The benefits are likely to come from polyphenols - compounds that white wine, beer and cider have far less of, the King's College London team says. Star Trek actor to be launched into space 9 Risking death trying to get to England in a pedalo. Video Risking death trying to get to England in a pedalo
Squid Game subtitles 'change meaning of the show' 4 Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram back after outage View comments Related Topics Alcohol Diet & nutrition Wine More on this story 'Super poo donors' wanted A glass a fortnight was enough to make a difference, but researchers say the findings are not an excuse to binge. "It should be remembered that high levels of alcohol intake are linked with an increased risk of a range of health problems including some cancers, heart disease, stroke and liver disease, and that to keep health risks from alcohol to a low level it is recommended that adults do not drink more than 14 units a week on a regular basis." Our diets, lifestyles and some types of medication that we may take can upset this finely balanced gut ecosystem. China jets continue flights in Taiwan defence zone 6 Windows 11 launches with redesigned start menu 2 The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology , looked at thousands of people living in the UK, the US and the Netherlands. None of the participants was a heavy drinker. World leaders deny wrongdoing after Pandora leaks 5 It was one of the darkest moments in Brazilian football ‘Excessive’ media gaze on star son after drug bust ‘Excessive’ media gaze on star son after drug bust 3 What happens to your body in extreme heat? How Modi speaks the language of India's millennials 8 Researcher Dr Caroline Le Roy said: "This is an observational study so we cannot prove that the effect we see is caused by red wine." Alex White, assistant nutrition scientist at the British Nutrition Foundation, said: "The findings from this study are interesting, and the effects of our diet on the bacteria in our gut is a really exciting area of science. Five ways this Supreme Court could change America Gut bacteria may have motor neurone disease role String theory - a simple way to understand the universe Muhammad cartoonist Lars Vilks dies in car crash 10 BBC Worklife: Why women are so burned out 11 hours ago Features The flood that drowned American dreams "You do not need to drink every day and it is still advised to consume alcohol with moderation." does red wine damage your skin